Charles Weidman Dance Foundation

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Visualization

Visualization or From a Farm in New Jersey

Robert Kosinski has shared some wonderful photos of Charles

Weidman’s last composition, Visualization or from a Farm in New Jersey.

Visualization

A program from a 1974 performance of “Visualization or From a Farm in New Jersey.”

Visualization-jpg-CWDF002Visualization-jpg-CWDF003Paying homage to his early years with Denishawn, Weidman dedicated this

dance to Ruth St. Denis. It premiered a year before Weidman’s death.

Part One is an eleven minute solo created for Janet Towner, tracing the

transformation of the cavorting farm girl, Ruthie Dennis, into the sublime

Ruth St. Denis.

Visualization-jpg-CWDF004The dance starts with the child’s exuberant and athletic

romps on the farm, her explorations of rippling arm movements, her playing

with fabric on a clothes line to create a saree, and includes two early solos

from her East Indian Series: The Yogi and Incense.

Visualization-jpg-CWDF005Visualization-jpg-CWDF006 Part Two is a pastiche of signature Denishawn dances including

Ruth’s Greek Veil Plastique and Nautch, Shawn’s Gnossienne, Japanese

Spear Dance, and Dance of Shiva, Humphrey’s first choreography for

Denishawn Valse Caprice also known as Scarf Dance, Martha Graham in Shawn’s

Serenata Morisca, Charles Weidman in Shawn’s Danse Americaine and

Crapshooter. Part Two concludes with The Garden of Kama, the first

choreographic collaboration of St. Denis and Shawn from 1915.Visualization-jpg-CWDF007 Visualization-jpg-CWDF008 Visualization-jpg-CWDF009

Margaret O’Sullivan

margaret-tom-cropped

Margaret O’Sullivan was a member of the CWDF Board of Directors since 1989. She was a member of the last generation of dancers to dance with Charles Weidman in his theater dance company in the 1970’s. She appeared in Mr. Weidman’s works including the Christmas and Easter Oratorios, Lynchtown, Brahms Waltzes, Opus 51 Opening Dance, Bargain Counter, The Thurber Fables, The War Between Men and the Women, and others. In addition to working on the Board of Directors, she was involved in the production of our award-winning documentary Charles Weidman: On His Own. She also participated in The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation’s presentation of our Humphrey-Weidman Gala at The Sylvia and Danny Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College in New York in 1994. Later Margaret was instrumental in arranging, staging, coaching, and teaching Mr. Weidman’s works in our educational outreach initiative at several institutions including New York University, Montclair State University, and the José Limón- Professional Dance Program. With Janet Towner she staged excerpts from the Easter Oratorio at NYU that were performed in New York City at the 92nd Street Y Legacy Series in 2010. In 2011, Margaret staged Brahms Waltzes at NYU while coaching MSU students in Lynchtown. Both dances were performed at the 92nd Street Y for the 110th anniversary of Charles Weidman’s birth, the 75th anniversary of Lynchtown and the 50th anniversary of Brahms Waltzes. Margaret staged Lynchtown for Nimbus Dance Works, which was performed at the Alvin Ailey Theater in 2012 and all over the Northeast for Nimbus’ Lynchtown/Thistown Project in 2013. She had been tireless in her dedication to the legacy of Charles Weidman and The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation.

Margaret O'Sullivan in the Easter Oratorio

Margaret O’Sullivan in the Easter Oratorio

The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation would like to invite all who knew Margaret to send us your remembrances of her, whether through dance or not, which we will post on our website, Facebook page, and blog. We want to do this to pay tribute to her dedication to Charles Weidman and the Charles Weidman Dance Foundation and to celebrate her life.

Send your remembrances to: charlesweidman@gmail.com or to our mailing address.

 

Remembrances

I want to express how heart broken I feel as a result of the loss of my dear friend and colleague. Margaret and I were not only members of the CWDF board, we were members of Charles Weidman’s Theater Dance Company and performed together at the Expression of Two Arts Theater on West 29th Street in New York City. We would often reminisce about the Sunday night performances Charles gave 52 weeks a year. Margaret and I “starred” as Mary and Joseph in the Christmas Oratorio. During the recitative describing their plight in Bethlehem looking for a room, there would be a pause in the dancing. Then Margaret and I would make our way, on our knees, around the perimeter of the stage miming a knock on the door of the inns – then being turned away by the innkeeper. Sometimes, with our backs to the audience, we would kibitz with each other while making our way from inn to inn. After each performance Charles would always invite us back to his living quarters in the back of the studio where we would talk about the performance and the audience reaction and any flubs we made during the performance – Charles spotted everything. We worked hard in class and during rehearsals, but those Sunday night performances were worth all the sweat and hard work. Margaret always remembered them fondly. She liked to tell the story of her first visit to Charles’ studio. On her first day she arrived a little early and climbed the stairs to the second floor. She knocked on the door and was flabbergasted when Charles himself opened the door and welcomed her in. After introductions, Charles showed her the “dressing” room, which was a small alcove near the front door separated from the studio by a white sheet – the men and women dressing rooms were separated by another sheet. A few more words were exchanged and as Charles headed back to the living quarters he turned to Margaret and said “And by the way, you’re very pretty!” And so shall she remain to me.

-Robert Kosinski, President CWDF Board of Directors

 

I remember Margaret from Expression of Two Arts Theater on West 29 st. After hours of rehearsal and an evening performance, Margaret still had energy.  She was always perky.  One day Margaret was teaching Brahms Waltzes and I asked her how, after all these years she still remembered all the choreography of so many pieces.  She said, “I don’t know,  I just have done them so many times that it flows from one move to the next.”  After the Sunday performances Margaret and everyone moved to Charles’ apartment for lamb stew and Rhinegarten wine.

-Charles Wilson, Secretary, CWDF Board of Directors

 

My condolences to you and your board of directors for the loss of your friend and colleague, Margaret O’Sullivan. Having been the youngest member of Charles’ troupe in 1954/55, living under his roof, while he developed in ten months time, The War Between Men and Women.  I can vouch for the excitement he generated in his dancers for the art and tenacity it took to create such a piece of work. At that time in his life he was battling alcohol addiction and smoking heavily.  Remarkably, it was the love of Dance and the people who surrounded him that saved him for the many years that followed. Here’s a toast to you, your former board member, Margaret O’Sullivan, and your current board of The Charles Weidman Foundation, for carrying on the memory of his work, which was his life.
-Mary Providence Magill
I cannot tell you how sorry I am to hear about Margaret. I had such a wonderful, wonderful time working with her on the Brahms Waltzes. For me it was such a great time and experience, and getting to know Margaret was just a delight. I am so sorry for your loss of such a beautiful friend.
-Kathleen Tagg

I met Margaret as a second year student at Tisch School of the Arts, NYU while learning Weidman’s Easter Oratorio. Her lively energy was contagious and her devotion to the work made us truly care about the integrity of the work. I worked as a dancer and later as a consultant with Margaret for five years and I feel incredibly lucky to have had such an amazing friend. I will always remember Margaret at the CWDF fundraiser in April 2014. While a performance of Lynchtown was happening, I couldn’t stop watching Margaret in the audience- she followed every movement with her body and facial expressions. She was living in the dance even when she wasn’t dancing. She was remarkable to learn from, to work with, and to have as a friend.

-Julia Jurgilewicz, CWDF Administrative Consultant

 

 

 

The CWDF loses a beloved member

From the President, Board of Directors

It is with great sadness and a broken heart that I tell you Margaret O’Sullivan – dear friend, mother, grandmother, dancer, teacher, colleague, and Co-president of the Board of Directors died Tuesday October 21, 2014. The cause was cancer.

Margaret O'Sullivan in "Branches"

Margaret O’Sullivan in “Branches”

Margaret was a member of the last generation of dancers to dance with Charles Weidman in his theater dance company in the 1970’s. She appeared in Mr. Weidman’s works including the Christmas and Easter Oratorios, Lynchtown, Brahms Waltzes, Opus 51 Opening Dance, Bargain Counter, the Thurber Fables, The War Between the Men and the Women, and others. Margaret was a member of the CWDF Board of Directors since 1989 and was involved in the production of our award-winning documentary Charles Weidman: On His Own. She also participated in The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation’s presentation of our Humphrey-Weidman Gala at The Sylvia and Danny Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College in New York in 1994. Later Margaret was instrumental in arranging, staging, coaching, and teaching Mr. Weidman’s works in our educational outreach initiative at several institutions including New York University, Montclair State University, and the José Limón- Professional Dance Program. With Janet Towner she staged excerpts from the Easter Oratorio at NYU that was performed in at the 92nd Street Y Legacy Series in 2010. In 2011 Margaret staged Brahms Waltzes at NYU while coaching MSU students in Lynchtown. Both dances were performed at the 92nd Street Y for the 110th anniversary of Charles Weidman’s birth, the 75th anniversary of Lynchtown and the 50th anniversary of Brahms Waltzes. Margaret staged Lynchtown for Nimbus Dance Works, which was performed at the Alvin Ailey Theater in 2012 and all over the Northeast for Nimbus’ Lynchtown/Thistown Project in 2013. She had been tireless in her dedication to the legacy of Charles Weidman and The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation. We will miss her dearly.

Board Members Margaret O'Sullivan and Thomas McNally May 1, 1994 at the Humphrey-Weidman Gala at the Sylvia & Danny Kaye Playhouse. Photo by Larry Hall.

Board Members Margaret O’Sullivan and Thomas McNally May 1, 1994 at the Humphrey-Weidman Gala at the Sylvia & Danny Kaye Playhouse. Photo by Larry Hall.

I want to express how heart broken I feel as a result of the loss of my dear friend and colleague. Margaret and I were not only members of the CWDF board, we were members of Charles Weidman’s Theater Dance Company and performed together at the Expression of Two Arts Theater on West 29th Street in New York City. We would often reminisce about the Sunday night performances Charles gave 52 weeks a year. Margaret and I “starred” as Mary and Joseph in the Christmas Oratorio. During the recitative describing their plight in Bethlehem looking for a room, there would be a pause in the dancing. Then Margaret and I would make our way, on our knees, around the perimeter of the stage miming a knock on the door of the inns – then being turned away by the innkeeper. Sometimes, with our backs to the audience, we would kibitz with each other while
making our way from inn to inn. After each performance Charles would always invite us back to his living quarters in the back of the studio where we would talk about the performance and the audience reaction and any flubs we made during the performance – Charles spotted everything. We worked hard in class and during rehearsals, but those Sunday night performances were worth all the sweat and hard work. Margaret always remembered them fondly. She liked to tell the story of her first visit to Charles’ studio. On her first day she arrived a little early and climbed the stairs to the second floor. She knocked on the door and was flabbergasted when Charles himself opened the door and welcomed her in. After introductions, Charles showed her the “dressing” room, which was a small alcove near the front door separated from the studio by a white sheet – the men and women dressing rooms were separated by another sheet. A few more words were exchanged and as Charles headed back to the living quarters he turned to Margaret and said “And by the way, you’re very pretty!” And so shall she remain to me.

Margaret and Milly Rockefeller at the CWDF fundraiser in April 2014.

Margaret and Milly Rockefeller at the CWDF fundraiser in April 2014.

Robert Kosinski
The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation, Inc.

The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation would like to invite all who knew Margaret to send us your remembrances of her, whether through dance or not, which we will post on our website, Facebook page, and blog. We want to do this to pay tribute to her dedication to Charles Weidman and the Charles Weidman Dance Foundation and
to celebrate her life. Send your remembrances to: charlesweidman@gmail.com or to our mailing address.

The Easter Oratorio

In 1967, Charles Weidman choreographed Easter Oratorio, a beautifully simplistic and joyous dance that premiered at the Expression of Two Arts Theater in NYC. It featured multiple sections including ensemble numbers and a trio for women all surrounding the topic of rejoicing at the resurrection. In the later part of Weidman’s career, his pieces took on spiritual tones which was unique to his previous genres of  choreography. He especially focused on classical music by composers Brahms, Bach, Beethoven and choreographing joyous, grand, exalting movement.  His first pursuit in this new tone was Christmas Oratorio to music by Bach created in 1961 followed by  Easter Oratorio six years later also to music by Bach.

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Tisch School of the Arts dancers performing “Fugue” at the 92nd St Y
Photo by Julie Lemberger

Weidman believed that music and dance were one, and Easter Oratorio is a prime example of how his movement was inspired by the composition of the music. “Fugue”, the opening dance of the Oratorio, features an ensemble of dancers moving in structured sections in time and sequence with the music. A fugue is a compositional structure where a short melody or phrase is taken up by other instruments/voices at sequential, overlapping timings (think of “Row, row, row your boat” sung in a round). Weidman took these overlapping sections and did the same with his choreography; the women start moving with one theme followed by the men taking up the same or different movement overlapping the women to create a beautiful, yet mathematic assembly of elated bodies.

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“Fugue”
Photo by Julia Lemberger

Though Charles enjoyed following the structure of the music with his dance, he did so in an interesting way. Margaret O’Sullivan (Foundation Vice-President and Weidman company dancer) reflects on how Charles choreographed to the music in a unexpected way. Instead of starting on the 1 of every six counts, the impetus for the beginning of the phrase was always on the 6, making the movement seem to spurt out and grow in a way the was organic with the music, but simultaneously following its own rhythm and flow. This gives the Fugue the impression of always rolling forward and creates a play between the push and pull of the music and the dancers.

Margaret O'Sullivan in "Branches"

Margaret O’Sullivan in “Branches”

In 2010, the Charles Weidman Dance Foundation partnered with Tisch School of the Arts, NYU to re-stage and perform two sections from the Easter Oratorio. Janet Towner assisted by Margaret O’Sullivan taught the Tisch dancers the “Fugue” and the trio “Branches”. The two performances of these excerpts at the 92nd St Y and at Baryshnikov Arts Center were not only the first instance of Weidman/Bach performed to live music, but also the first time the excerpts had been shown in NYC since Weidman’s death.

Easter Oratorio 027

Janet Towner working with dancer Michael Gonzalez 
Photo by Larry Hall

The trio, “Branches” features three women holding laurel branches and circling around one another in sweeping and jumping movement. Each woman has a solo moment involving the first dancer with one branch, the second soloist with two, and the final woman wielding three branches in the formation of the cross. Each solo also contributes a different mood to the piece, the first stretching and arching on the floor with the single branch pointing to the sky, the second reaching and honoring with arms outstretched in a V shape , and the third swirling and whirling in praise and delight beneath the cross shaped branches.

The third solo moment in "Branches"

The third solo moment in “Branches”
Photo by Larry Hall

Elinor Rogosin in The Dancemakers: Conversations with American Choreographers speaks to how “the expression of the joy of the resurrection is the overwhelming mood in the piece” and how as an audience member, you “could have been eavesdropping on someone at prayer”. Rogosin comments on the simplicity of the choreography and the absence of acrobatic movement “creating a refreshing impact of naive expression”. When learning Easter Oratorio, Tisch alumni Elizabeth Montgomery reflects on the technique of the face and chest in order to achieve the look of ecstasy: “I remember Margaret explaining to us the intention of “space in the face;” it should be as though you’re looking past whatever is in the room in front of you, as though you’re looking out into the horizon from someplace very high. Maintaining that energy in an of itself is exhausting. Now add the jumps, hinges, and pivots, and Easter Oratorio becomes one of the most challenging pieces I’ve ever danced, in spite of its choreographic simplicity”.

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“Fugue”
Photo by Larry Hall

“Bach’s dramatic intent in the Easter Oratorio is the expression of the joy of the Resurrection.  Despite the fringes of melancholy added by the adagio, and by some of the recitatives, the overwhelming mood is one of rejoicing”. -Charles Weidman on a 1971 program

1971 performance of Easter Oratorio

1971 performance of Easter Oratorio

Post by Julia Jurgilewicz

Support

Help the Foundation achieve its goals

With your contribution, you are directly helping to support our goals and initiatives to keep the legacy of Charles Weidman alive. Click the Make a Donation button below to make a contribution to the Foundation through Paypal. We thank you for your interest in the Foundation and for continuing the knowledge and history of American modern dance!
Did you know that many companies offer Matching Gift Programs that can double or triple the amount of your gift? Please inquire with your employer and submit a matching gift form if you are eligible. Thank you!


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Join the Board of Directors

Interested in getting involved? Do you want to actively help keep alive the legacy of our great American modern dance pioneers? The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation is actively looking to increase their board of directors. Contact the Foundation at charlesweidman@gmail.com to become a member and share your input, advice and passion for the preservation of the Weidman legacy.

Volunteer

Want to help the foundation with educational outreach, marketing, and funding? The Foundation is looking for volunteers in the fields of Development, Media, and Grant Researching/Writing. If you would like to volunteer your services, please contact the Foundation at charlesweidman@gmail.com and help the Foundation carry out it’s goals. We would love to work with you!

Past Donors

The CWDF would like to thank all of their supporters who have donated in the past.

Jane R. Abrahms
Anya Adler-Friess
Adrian J. Allen
Allswell Restaurant
Judith B. Alter
Madge F. Altschuler
Angela Amedore-Caplan
Mary Anthony
Ida Arbeit
Anna Asbel
Athleta Clothing Store
Mirielle Backer
Maxine Bacon
Karen Barracuda
Barry Barychko
Valerie Beaman
Renate Belville
Harriet Berg
David & Goldie Berkley
Sidney Bernstein
Larry Lee Blackman
Lee Bohrer
Gloria A. Bonali
Judith Stuart Borosin
Lynn Matluck Brooks
Virginia Brooks
Al Brooks/Munt-Brooks Studio
Thomas T. Brown
Beaumont F. Bruestle
Rosanna Buonocore
Elizabeth Burtner
Chase Cambron, North Coast Wineries
Edward Fausty
Bonnie Genkins
Dr. Elaine F. Genkins
Eve Gentry
Saida Gerrard
Sherry Parker Geyelin
Sara Lee Gibb
Gina Gibney, Gibney Dance Center
Margaret Gisolo
Claudia S. Gitelman
The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation
Susan Glazer
Frances R. Glicksman
Marianne L. Goldberg
Joan Goldhammer
Marvin Gordon
James A. Gould
Lois Gravier
Miriam Gray
Jay Green
Lois Gruber
Glenn A. Gruen
John Gruen
Ann Hutchinson Guest
Elizabeth Hart Guiher
Bonnie Bird Gundlach
Mr. & Mrs. Larry Hall
Nadira Hall
Alice Halpern
Peter Hamilton
Marjorie R. Hanson
Cleo Hark
The Harkness Foundations for Dance
Leah Harpaz
Peter Harris
Louise Allen Haviland
Elizabeth Hayes
Martha Hill
Sarah Hillmon
Wendy Hilton
Ann Hjelle
Marian Horosko
Dawn Lillie Horwitz
Tami Horowitz
Loyce Houlton
Lucas Hoving
Margaret B. Howard
Myra Hushansky-Berk
Ethel Winter Hyman
Charlotte York Irey
Marjorie S. Isaac
Virginia N. Jinks
Lydia Joel
Hazel K. Johnson
Josephine A. Johnson
Betty Jones
David N. Jones
Genevieve Jones
Tanisha Jones, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
The Jose Limon Dance Foundation
Elizabeth Kagan
Samuel Kamen & Edith Segal
Albert Kaplan
Vivian Karp
Ann W. Kealiinohomoku
Carolyn R. Keleman
Rebecca Kelly
Diane Kessler (Mehlin)
Eleanor King
Susan Kirschner
Louise Kloepper
Nancy E. Klotz
G. Helen Koenig
Diane Kosinski
Sherry & Robert Kosinski
Ivan & Annette Krakowsky
Robert Magill
Mark Morris Dance Group
Kim Menaster
Meredith Monk
Douglas Nielsen
Om Factory
Ginger Perowsky
Phoebe Rose Sandford
Anna Sokolow
Estelle Sommers
Cleo Atheneos Stark
Ernestine Stodelle
Vic Stornant
Rose L. Strasser
Julie Sutton
Clay Talliaferro
Alice Teirstein
Liz Thompson
Pauline Tish
Anne Tolbert
Linda J. & Steven F. Tomko
Janet Towner
Alta Lu Townes
Margery J. Turner
Mike Udvardy
Juan Valensuela
Valley School of Dance
The Vanoff Family Foundation
Bessie Shonberg Varley
Cathy Velenchik
Lucy Venable
Carol Walker
Lula M. Wall
Lea S. Wallace
Charlotte Walsh
Suzanne Walther
Kathleen E. Ward
Nancy L. Warner
Constance Wechsler
Winifred Widener
Theodora Wiesner
Hannah C. Wiley
James H. Willey
George Willis
Charles Wilson
Paul Wilson
Mike & Judith Wodynski
Albert & Roberta Wohlstetter
Joan Wohlstetter & Larry Hall
Mercy Dobell Wolfe
Carl Wolz
David & Marni Wood
Kay B. Woodard
Charles Woodford
Dianne L. Woodruff
Shela Xoregos
Young Dancers In Repertory, Inc.
Hortense Zera

Highlights

2016

Preservation and Digitization of Three Films in the NYPL Weidman Archive- The CWDF provided funds to digitize the three films “Flickers,” “Letter to Mrs. Bixby,” and “Traditions” in the Charles Weidman Moving Image Archive at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Jerome Robbins Dance Division. The three filmswere preserved and digitized for longevity and easier access to the public. Thank you to our donors for making this possible. We will continue to search for funds to preserve and digitize the remaining films in the collection.  Check out our Preservation Project page for updates or to make a donation.

Dance is a Weapon NDG 1932/1955- The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation was pleased to support the CNDC in Angers, France by supplying video footage of Charles Weidman’s “Lynchtown” for their exhibition about the New Dance Group displayed at Le Quai May 16th- June 17th, 2016.

2015

Katherine Litz’s “Glyph” performed at the ICA Boston- Polly Motley performed Katherine Litz’s “Glyph” as part of the Black Mountain College Exhibit at the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston on October 17th and 18th, 2015. The performance was made possible with support from the Charles Weidman Dance Foundation and the New York Library for the Performing Arts, Jerome Robbins Dance Division.

Nimbus Dance Works Performs Weidman’s “Lynchtown” in their 2015 season at BAM-Nimbus Dance Works celebrated its 10th anniversary season May 8 and 9, 2015 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Fisher Hall. The evening programs featured Pearl Primus’ 1942 work Strange Fruit and Charles Weidman’s 1936 work Lynchtown, which was performed alongside a companion piece, Thistown, by student dancers from New Jersey City University and Drew University.

NET Nebraska airs “Charles Weidman: On His Own”- In conjunction with Ballet Nebraska’s performances of Weidman’s iconic work, On My Mother’s Side, NET Nebraska aired the CWDF’s award winning documentary April 19th at 2pm. The presentation of “Charles Weidman: On His Own” was made possible with the permission and support of The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation, Inc.

2014

Preservation of the Charles Weidman Moving Image Archive: The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation Fundraiser- The CWDF hosted a fundraising event on Friday April 18th, 2014 at Gibney Dance Center where they presented Lynchtown and Branches. Donations supported our initiative to preserve and digitize the Weidman moving image archive of iconic American modern dance at the New York Public Library of the Performing Arts.

Lynchtown in San Diego, CA- Charles Weidman alumnus, George Willis,  staged Lynchtown for the Minerva Tapia Dance Group from Tijuana, Mexico and performed the iconic work at San Diego Dance Theater’s Live Arts Festival!

2013

Lynchtown/Thistown- project spearheaded by Samuel Potts of Nimbus Dance Works with support from the Charles Weidman Dance Foundation. Nimbus artists worked with high school students from NJ on creating dances that deal with a social or political issue that the students wanted to explore and speak out on. On June 9, 2013 Nimbus Dance Works performed Weidman’s Lynchtown alongside the original creations of five NJ high schools at the Victoria J. Mastrobuono Theater, Rutgers University, NJ.

Lynchtown- performed by Nimbus Dance Works in their New York Season at the Alvin Ailey Citigroup Theater in February 2013 and their New Jersey Season at Barrow Mansion in May 2013. Staged by Margaret O’Sullivan with support from the Charles Weidman Dance Foundation, this Weidman dance is recognized as one of the classic works of American Modern Dance.

Lecture/Discussion on Weidman’s Lynchtown- Dr. Jeff Friedman of Rutgers University led a lecture/discussion on Weidman’s classic work Lynchtown (1936) in which he dissected how art and persuasion co-mingle to form a vehicle for bringing political and social awareness. The lecture included archival video and photos and live dance demonstration by Nimbus Dance Works dancers. Nimbus’ staging of Lynchtown was made possible by the Charles Weidman Dance Foundation.

Study in Contrast- performed by Jennifer Conley at the 92nd St Y’s Fridays at Noon series. Staged by Nadira Hall, Study in Contrast was performed in its first solo performance on February 1, 2013. Accompanied by piano, dancer Jennifer Conley demonstrated Weidman’s creation for teaching composition to dance students.

2012

Opus 51

Opus 51

Opus 51: Opening Dance- performance presented by Montclair University dancers with assistance from the Foundation at Montclair State University, reconstructed and staged by Margaret O’Sullivan.  Performed at Montclair State University, NJ. and the 92nd Street Y in NYC.

2011
Brahms Waltzes
– 50th anniversary performance of the complete Brahms Waltzes at the 92nd Street Y, NYC, staged by Margaret O’Sullivan.

Lynchtown – 75th anniversary performance of Lynchtown presented with assistance from the Foundation at the 92nd Street Y, coached by Margaret O’Sullivan

Charles Weidman: On His Own – Award winning film produced by the Foundation shown at the Woodstock Diamond Sokolow Dance Theatre, Woodstock, NY “Voices of Modern Dance Film Event,” and the Centre Pompidou, Paris, in their “Vidéodanse” Series.

2010
Easter Oratorio: Branches and Fugue-  First performance of Weidman/Bach Project to live music.  First New York performance of excerpts from Easter Oratorio since Weidman’s death.    Reconstructed and staged by Janet Towner and assisted by  Margaret O’Sullivan.  Performed at the 92nd Street Y, NYC and the Baryshnikov Arts Center.

2003
75th anniversary of the first Humphrey-Weidman concert-
Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz proclaims March 24th Humphrey-Weidman day in Brooklyn.

1996
Ceremony- plaque presentation and reception commemorating first Humphrey Weidman concert.

1994
Humphrey-Weidman Gala: Dances from Their Years Together-
 Dances from their first concert together in 1928 through 1945 at the  Danny Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College, NYC.

Lynchtown

Lynchtown

1993
Lynchtown performed at SUNY Purchase, NY and in Taiwan- Bargain Counter performed at Louis Abrons Arts Center as part of the Henry Street Settlement Centennial Celebration Reconstruction of David and Goliath and Submerged Cathedral by Peter Hamilton.

Charles Weidman Technique and Repertory Workshop- Taught by Peter Hamilton in New York City at the 92nd Street Y.

1992
Redivivio: Experiences in Reconstruction-
 Performance of dances and a panel of experts discussing aspects of reconstruction.  DIA Center for the Arts, NYC.

1990 and 1992
Charles Weidman Technique and Repertory Workshop-
Taught by Janet Towner in New York City.

1990
On My Mother’s Side-
 First New York performance since Mr. Weidman’s death. Reconstructed and staged by Peter Hamilton and danced by Douglas Nielsen.

Charles Weidman: On His Own- Completion and first screening of award-winning video documentary commissioned and produced by The Charles Weidman Dance Foundation.

1989
A Charles Weidman Celebration – The Influences of Charles Weidman panel discussion moderated by Marian Horosko featuring reminiscences by Eleanor King, Alwin Nikolais, Betty Osgood, Nadine Gae & others with a technique demonstration and performances of Weidman’s Christmas Oratorio, Brahms Waltzes, Bargain Counter and Humphrey’s Duo-Drama at the Jose Limon Studio.

Flickers

Flickers

1986
Roots of American Modern Dance – performance of Weidman’s Flickers, Lynchtown, trio from Christmas Oratorio as well as choreography by Loie Fuller, Isadora Duncan, Michio Ito, Ruth St. Denis, Ted Shawn, Helen Tamiris, and Doris Humphrey (Water Study, Call & Breath of Fire, Two Ecstatic Themes) at Aaron Davis Hall, CCNY.

1985
Remembering Charles Weidman
– a group reminiscence.

1983
Honoring Charles Weidman – performance of Weidman’s Fables for Our Time and Brahms Waltzes as wells as works by Humphrey, Koner, Limon and Shawn.